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In recent years, more and more workers in the UK have been put on zero-hours contracts – a form of employment where the worker is not guaranteed any hours of work. While some people prefer the flexibility that zero-hours contracts can offer, others find them highly uncertain and unpredictable. If you`re on a zero-hours contract, you may be worried about whether your employer has the right to change your contract to zero hours. In this article, we`ll explore this issue in more detail.

The short answer to the question of whether your employer can change your contract to zero hours is yes. If your current contract does not specify a certain amount of hours per week or month, your employer can change it to zero hours at any time. However, if you have been working regular hours for a significant amount of time, you may have grounds to challenge such a change.

Under UK employment law, workers who have been with their employer for more than two years have the right to request flexible working. This means you can request a change to your weekly hours, for example, if you need to care for a child or relative. However, your employer can refuse your request if it has a valid reason for doing so.

If your employer changes your contract to zero hours without your consent, you may be able to take legal action against them. For example, you could claim constructive dismissal or argue that your employer has breached the terms of your original contract. It`s worth noting that if you continue to work for your employer without challenging the change, you may be deemed to have accepted the new terms.

In summary, while your employer can legally change your contract to zero hours, they need to have a valid reason for doing so. If you have been working regular hours for a significant amount of time, you may be able to challenge a change to your contract. If you`re unsure about your rights as a zero-hours worker, it`s worth seeking advice from a legal expert or trade union representative.